6/23/2018

Omori district Ota

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. Famous Places and Powerspots of Edo 江戸の名所 .
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Oomori, Ōmori 大森 Omori district "Great Forest"
Oota 大田区 大森東. 大森西, 大森北, 大森本町, 大森中 Sub-districts in the East, West, North, Main Omori and Central Omori.

It used to be written 大杜 and later renamed Omori mura 大森村 Omori Village in the Edo period.
Omori mura was a very large rural area, the parts on the beach were fishing villages.
In the Edo period it was located along the Tokaido Highway, between
1. Shinagawa-juku 品川宿 (Shinagawa) and .2. Kawasaki-juku 川崎宿 (Kawasaki).
It was often called
Ai no Shuku 間の宿 Station inbetween.
The farmers used rice straw to make small figures of animals and sell them to the travelers.
There were also three merchants selling Wachuusan 和中散 Wachusan, a powder medicine loved by tired travelers. Tokugawa Ieyasu used to take this medicine for stomach troubles.

. The 53 Stations of the Tokaido Highway .




When Ota Dokan visited here, he wrote the following poem

大森の木の下かげの涼しさに知るも知らぬも立ちどまりけり

. 太田道灌 Ota Dokan (1432 - 1486) .
Founder of Edo Castle.

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- quote
Ōmori is a district located a few kilometers south of Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan accessed by rail via the Keihin Tohoku line, or by road via Dai Ichi Keihin. Ōmorikaigan, the eastern area of Ōmori, can be reached via the Keikyu line.
Ōmori is one of many areas in Tokyo's largest ward, Ōta-ku,
and was formerly home to the German International School before its relocation to Yokohama. High quality residential and retail developments that the German school attracted are present in the Ōmori-sannō area. Ōmori is home to the headquarters of the automotive company Isuzu, which has offices in the Belport complex a few hundred metres from Ōmori station.
Prior to its development as a convenient residential and business location, Ōmori was laced with a network of small rivers which were used by many locals for drying harvested nori (seaweed), a staple of the Japanese diet. Modern Ōmori is built on mostly reclaimed land, and is very much a traditional Shinto area; there are many shrines in the area, and during the August o-bon festival, mikoshi parades are very common.
Ōmori-sannō, to the west of Ōmori station,
is an upscale neighbourhood compared to the other side of the tracks, and Ōmori-sannō is known to be traditionally an area where Japanese poets, philosophers and writers have made their home.
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !



- quote
..... it’s part of the coastal area that was called 品川沖 Shinagawa-oki, an ambiguous term that in the Edo Period could refer to a coastline or the open sea or, well, just the sea.
..... the closest station to the ruins of Suzugamori Execution Ground is called 大森海岸駅 Ōmori Kaigan Eki, literally Ōmori Coast Station but that area is still in Shinagawa Ward.
..... What comes to mind are things like - execution grounds, fishing villages, and trees. Lots and lots of trees.
..... Edward Morse,
an American naturalist/zoologist who specialized in shellfish, came to Japan in 1877 and helped the first incarnation of Tōkyō Daigaku 東京大学 Tōkyō University establish a zoology department. Along the way, and perhaps by accident, he launched archaeology and anthropology in Japan when he discovered a 貝塚 kaizuka midden (a mound made of discarded shellfish) in Ōmori. This was Japan’s first archaeological dig and it was a major discovery in that it showed the Japanese that their origin wasn’t really recorded in books like the 日本書紀 Nihon Shoki. It showed that science could prove that Japan’s history actually went way farther back than anyone had ever imagined. The shells and pottery fragments dated from the Late Jōmon Period, about 2000-1000 BCE. The term Jōmon which all Japanese will recognize as a legitimate prehistoric era is actually a translation of Morse’s English description of the pottery samples he found. He noticed rope-like patterns and called them “cord marked” which was translated into Japanese as 縄文 “rope-design.”
..... this part of Edo Bay was renowned for its fish and nori 海苔 seaweed. This local specialty was generally referred to as Edo-mae nori 江戸前海苔 seaweed from Edo Bay, but each area had its unique brands. 品川海苔 Shinagawa Nori, 大森海苔 Ōmori Nori, and 芝町海苔 Shiba Machi Nori were some of the most sought after brands, the latter being the most prestigious. The development and modernization of Tōkyō Bay in the 50’s and 60’s more or less put an end to the fishing and nori cultivation that typified the area for centuries.
One unique aspect of Ōmori
as opposed to other areas that were developed in the late Edo Period and “modern eras,” is that the actually coastline is still preserved to a certain extent. The ruins of Suzugamori Execution Ground are located next to Ōmori Kaigan Eki 大森海岸駅 Ōmori Coast Station. A short walk from the station will bring you to small inlet which is basically where the shoreline began in the Edo Period.
- source : japanthis.com/2014...


. Suzugamori keijoo 鈴ヶ森刑場 Suzugamori execution ground .

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source : oomori-aoiro.org/mall...


- quote -
Omori is peppered with historical significance and is located just south of central Tokyo. During World War 2, the Tokyo Base Camp and a prisoner of war camp was located here on an artificial island, now called Peace Island. Centuries before, this area was known for its shrines and for its villagers drying nori seaweed.
Shinagawa Historical Museum
is located just a 15 minute walk from Art Hotels Omori and has a lot of various artefacts dating back to the Edo period (1603 - 1868). An English leaflet is available which has most of the information about the exhibits There are also various models and videos around the museum and although they are not in English, you can understand it through the various sculptures, videos and photographs.
Kashima Shrine
has a thousand years of history and was considered one of the three great shrines in suburban Edo, the old name for Tokyo. Considering the shrine is only a 10 minute walk from Art Hotels Omori it is work checking out, and the area has various shrines, museums and shops. The main building has several seats which are used for ceremonies. Here they have various services such as a good luck amulet prayer, blessings for baby and a memorial service for aborted fetuses. This peaceful shrine is located just a few minutes from the Shinagawa Museum.
Naritasan Ennoji Temple
was established in 1571 and hosts multiple shrines and a graveyard. It’s a quiet place to relax, but watch out for the mosquitoes in summer. The big Buddha statue is situated just in front of the temple entrance and if you look through the window you can see various beautiful decorations inside the temple. This was one of my favourite temples with a peaceful and tranquil atmosphere.
Other local attractions here include
Shinagawa Kumin Park, Shinagawa Aquarium and Ohi Racecourse, which is also famous for its weekend flea markets.
- source : tokyo/exploring-omori... -

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大森和中散 Omori Wachusan
Edo Meisho Zue

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Plum Garden, Kamata (Kamata no Umezono)
Utagawa Hiroshige (Ando)

The entire Kamata area south of Ōmori was known for the cultivation of plum trees and was celebrated more for its early summertime fruits than its springtime blossoms.
The gentle beauty of this print tends to distract the viewer from the structure intruding from the right. It is a cushioned palanquin known as a yamakago ("mountain palanquin"), once widely used for travel in Japan. The overgarment left casually on top suggests that a traveler has recently stopped off for a brief rest from the nearby Tokaido highway that linked Edo to Kyoto.
- View of the extensive Plum Garden in the Kamata area. The estate which was open to the public complete with teahouses and a restaurant dated from the early Bunsei Period (1818-1830) and came to be known as
the "Plum Mansion" (Umeyashiki), with its several hundred trees extending into the distance. The owner of the mansion was a medicine dealer from Omori, whose chief product was a cold remedy called Wachusan.
The structure on the right is an indigo cushioned palanquin of the simple A-frame type known as a "yamakago" ("mountain palanquin") and was used widely for travel in Japan, suggesting that a traveler had stopped off from nearby Tokaido for a rest, leaving an over garment on top.
- source : brooklyn museum -

. Kamata 蒲田 "bulrush district" - Ota ward .
also called ume-no-ki mura 梅の木村 Umenoki mura "Village of the Plum Trees".


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- CLICK for more photos !

Ōmori Kaizuka 大森貝塚 Omori Shell Mound and Park
Excavation of Omori Shell Mounds
Omori Shell Mound was excavation by Dr. Morse from September to December in 1877 (10th year of the Meiji Era). Shell Mounds of Omori, Japan’s first excavation report was published in 1879 (12th year of the Meiji Era). The reason why the Omori Shell Mounds are called as the birthplace of Japanese is because Dr. Morse’s excavation was Japan’s first academic excavation. Later, Shinagawa City carried out excavations on two separate occasions in 1984 and 1993. The two excavations found large amounts of traces of dwelling sites, earthenwares, accessories, bones of fish and animals, and so on. Shinagawa Historical Museum displays some materials which were found from the excavations.
The park is the place of learning about the Jomon Era and Omori Shell Mounds. There are interactive exhibits as well as the Omori shell Mounds Monument which was built in 1929 (4th year of the Showa Era), and a bronze statue of Dr. Morse. The park also has a sol sample of the shell layer on display like the one at Shinagawa Historical Museum.
- source : city.shinagawa.tokyo.jp... -


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. nori 海苔 laver, sea lettuce - Introduction .


大森の海苔 Omori no nori
歌川国芳 Utagawa Kuniyoshi


海苔のふるさと会 Ōmori Nori Museum
2-2 Heiwanomorikoen, Ōta, Tokyo


- CLICK for more photos !
- reference source : norinoyakata.web... -



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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

................................................................................. Omori 大森区

牛に生まれ変わった僧侶 a priest reborn as a bull
Since all priest does is eat and sleep, it was thought that after his death he would be reborn a bull.
Once the priest of a certain ○○寺 temple died and his parishioners wrote the name of the temple when they buried him.
A few years later when a farmer with his bull passed here, he heard a voice call out:
"Hey you there, this is the ○○寺 temple!"
This bull (the re-born priest) had some strangely colored hair that could be interpreted as looking like ○○寺.

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- reference : nichibun yokai database -


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. Edo bakufu 江戸幕府 The Edo Government .

. Famous Places and Powerspots of Edo 江戸の名所 .

. Doing Business in Edo - 商売 - Introduction .

. shokunin 職人 craftsman, craftsmen, artisan, Handwerker .

. senryu, senryū 川柳 Senryu poems in Edo .

. Japanese Architecture - The Japanese Home .

. Interior Design - The Japanese Home .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .


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