Showing posts with label - - - Temples of Edo. Show all posts
Showing posts with label - - - Temples of Edo. Show all posts

1/02/2017

Karasuyama Temple Town

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. Famous Places and Powerspots of Edo 江戸の名所 .
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Karasuyama teramachi 烏山寺町 Karasuyama Temple Town

There are 26 temples in the area.
The area is called the Little Kyoto of Setagaya ward 世田谷の小京都.



からすやま寺町の歌 - The song of Karasuyama Temple Town
- reference source : www.youtube.com -

- quote -
The Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923 brought a virtual tidal wave of displaced refugees, and a flotilla of temples as well. Setagaya’s population nearly doubled, and Teramachi, or “temple town,” near Chitose-Karasuyama, offered land on which 26 temples damaged in the quake were rebuilt.
A variety of Buddhist sects are represented, and one temple, Senkoji, sequesters the grave site of world-renowned ukiyo-e artist Kitagawa Utamaro.
The hush over the area is eerie beyond words.
- A wave to Setagaya
- source : Kit Nagamura / Japan Times -

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01 Myookooji 妙高寺 Myoko-ji
Nichiren Sect.

The temple moved to Karasuyama in 1927 after the Great Kanto Earthquake in 1923. It retains a grave of the Mizuno family, the lord of the Yamagata domain. There are graves of 藤井右門 Fujii Umon, an advocate of the restoration of the Imperial rule, three Japanese-style painters: 速水御舟 Hayami Gyoshu (1894 - 1935),
今村紫紅 Imamura Shiko (1880 - 1916), 小村雪岱 Komura Settai (1887 - 1940), and 川之辺一朝 Kawanobe Itcho (1830 - 1910), a lacquer artist.
Myoko-ji HP : - reference source : myokozi.com -

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. 金剛山 Kongozan 悲願寺 Higan-Ji 多聞院 Tamon-In .
Nr. 03 of the Gofunai 御府内八十八ヶ所霊場 88 Henro Temples in Edo

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03 Joomanji 乗満寺 Joman-ji
Shinshu-otani School
The temple was originally located in Kaga and called Rinsho Temple. After moving to Setsu, Fushimi, Suruga then Edo, it changed its name to Joman Temple. It moved to Karasuyama in 1924. In the Edo period the temple had many patrons among 江戸期は幕臣関係の檀家 the vassals of the shogun.

04 Nyuurakuji 入楽寺 Nyuraku-ji
Shinshu-otani School
It was built in Hiramatsu-cho, Nihonbashi in 1648. After being moved to Matsuyama-cho, Asakusa, it was burnt down in the Great Kanto Earthquake. It moved to Karasuyama in 1927.

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05 Jooeiji 常栄寺 Joei-ji
Jodo-shin Sect. Honganji School

The buildings were all burnt in the Great Kanto Earthquake except for the principal image and the necrology. It moved to Karasuyama from Tsukiji in 1924.
There are the remains of a foundation stone of 菊田伊州 Kikuta Ishu (1791 - 1852), a Japanese-style painter.
Joei-ji HP - reference source : joueiji.net-

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06 Genshooji 源正寺 Gensho-ji
Jodo-shin Sect. Honganji School
The temple moved to Karasuyama from Tsukiji in 1932. They have metal tubs made by 藤原正次 Fujiwara Shoji,
a master of foundry in the Edo period, which were chosen as cultural assets.


07 Shinryuuji 幸龍寺 Shinryu-ji
Nichiren Sect.
The temple was originally built as a prayer hall for the Tokugawa family. It moved to Hamamatsu, Suruga, Yushima then Asakusa. It was damaged in the Great Kanto Earthquake. Its relocation to Karasuyama began in 1927 and was completed in 1940.

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08 Zonmyooji 存明寺 Zonmyo-ji
Shinshu-otani School

The temple was built at Sakurada-mon in the early Edo period. It moved to Azabu in the Meiji period, then to Karasuyama in 1927 after the 1923 earthquake. Teachings written by the chief priest are on display at the gate, and they are changed from time to time.
The temple features a dining facility for needy children, Zonmyōji Kodomo Shokudō - Cafeteria.
Zonmyo-ji HP : - reference source : zonmyoji.jp -

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09 Shoo-oo-in 稱往院 Shoo-in
Jodo Sect.
The temple was built in Yushima in 1596, then moved to Asakusa. It moved to Karasuyama in 1927 after the 1923 earthquake.

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source : tukitodora.exblog.jp

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10 Myooyuji 妙祐寺 Myoyu-ji
Jodo-shin Sect. Honganji School


source : saiseki.net/specialties/temple13

The temple was built in Shibuya in 1625 with the statue of 阿弥陀如来 Amida Nyorai which was dug out from the ground. It moved to Karasuyama due to the construction of the Ginza Line in 1937 and the re-zoning plan in 1949.
They have a unique main building which was built in the Indian style.

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11 Soofukuji 宗福寺 Sofuku-ji
Jodo Sect.
The temple moved to Karasuyama from Nippori after the 1923 earthquake.

12 Eiryuuji 永隆寺 Eiryu-ji
Hokke Sect.
日義上人 Nichiyoshi, a holy priest who taught the game of go to Tokugawa Ieyasu, built the temple in Kanda. Daikoku, a stone statue as the temple’s treasure, was given to the temple by お万の方 O-Man, one of Ieyasu’s concubines. The temple moved to Yanaka, Honjo, then to Karasuyama in 1928 after the 1923 earthquake.
There is a grave of 三遊亭圓生 Sanyutei Ensho (1839 - 1900), a Rakugo comic storyteller who was designated as a living national treasure.

13 Jooinji 浄因寺 Join-ji
Jodo-shin Sect. Honganji School
The temple used to retain a grave of the 福岡黒田藩士 Kuroda family, who were clansmen in Fukuoka. It moved from Azabu to Karasuyama in 1924.

14 Zengyooji 善行寺 Zengyo-ji
Jodo-shin Sect. Honganji School
The temple was originally built around Yokoyama-cho, Chuo-ku in the early Edo period, then moved to Tsukiji due to the large fire in the Meireki period. It moved to Karasuyma after the 1923 earthquake.

15 Manpukuji 萬福寺 Manpuku-ji, Mampukuji
Jodo-shin Sect. Honganji School
The temple was built in Hamacho in the early Edo period, then moved to Tsukiji during the Meireki period. It moved to Karasuyama after the 1923 earthquake.

16 Myoozenji 妙善寺 Myozen-ji
Jodo-shin Sect. Honganji School
北条家家臣菅原正円 Sugawara Shoen, a vassal of the Hojo family, was converted to Buddhism, became a pupil of Shinran and built a thatched cottage in Ise. It is said to have been the origin of the temple. It moved to Tsukiji near the fish market, where the priests were engaged in missionary work. So they have many believers among fish market workers. It moved to Karasuyama in 1927.

17 Myoojuuji 妙寿寺 Myoju-ji
Hokke Sect.
The temple was originally built in Yanaka. It moved to Honjo-sarue, then to Karasuyama in 1924 after the 1923 earthquake. There is a temple bell made by 藤原正次
Fujiwara Shoji, a master of foundry, which was partly burnt in the 1923 earthquake. The guest room was relocated from the former house of the 鍋島侯爵邸 Prince Nabeshima. 正隆廟 Shoryubyo, a hall to worship for future generations was newly built in 2000.

18 Senkooji 専光寺 Senko-ji
Jodo Sect.
The temple was originally built in Shinagawa, and moved to Bakurai-cho, then Asakusa. It moved to Karasuyama in 1927 after the 1923 earthquake. The main building and the monks’ living quarters were burnt due to the air raid in 1945. The main building was re-built in 1958. There is a grave of 喜多川歌麿 Kitagawa Utamaro (1753 - 1806), an ukiyo-e artist.

19 Eiganji 永願寺 Eigan-ji
Shinshu-otani School
越後の堀家家臣浄順 Jojun, a vassal of the Hori family in Echigo became a priest and built the temple in Kanda. It moved to Asakusa. The buildings were damaged by the 1923 earthquake, but its principle image Amida statue and the necrology were saved from the fire.

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20 Koogenin 高源院 Kogen-in
Rinzai Sect.

久留米藩有馬家 有馬頼元 Arima Yorimoto (1654 - 1705), the fourth lord of the Kurume domain, was converted to Buddhism and built the temple in Shinagawa. 怡渓和尚 Ikei, the first priest of the temple, mastered the tea ceremony. The Ikei division of the Ishikawa school still exists. The temple moved to Karasuyama in 1926. Its pond, Benten-ike, is known as a spot where wild ducks come and stay. In the center of the pond, there is a little shrine, 浮御堂 Ukigodo, which enshrines 宝生弁財天 Hosho Benzaiten.

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21 Genryooin 源良院 Genryo-in
Jodo Sect.
The temple moved to Karasuyama from Asakusa in 1925 due to the 1923 earthquake. It used to be a temple for trainee monks. It enshrines 火伏観世音 Hifuse Kanzeon Bosatsu, which was believed to protect the Edo towns from further damage from the fires.

22 Myooyooji 妙揚寺 Myoyo-ji
Nichiren Sect.
The temple moved to Karasuyama from Yanaka Imosaka in 1928.

23 Genshooji 玄照寺 Gensho-ji
Nichiren Sect.
日延上人 Nichien, a priest brought up by 加藤清正 Kato Kiyomasa, built the temple in Shiba Shirogane. It moved to Karasuyama in 1927. There is a grave of the 戸川 Togawa family of the Niwase domain and a statue of 鬼子母神 Kishibojin, the goddess of childbirth and children.

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24 Joofukuji 常福寺 Jofuku-ji
Kenpon-hokke Sect.

The temple was built in Asakusa in 1511, then moved to Karasuyama in 1928 due to the 1923 earthquake.
In the precincts there are porcelain 狸 Tanuki racoon dogs in all sizes, which symbolize wealth and happiness.
Jofuku-ji HP - reference source : joufukuji.com -

. Tanuki 狸 Badger, Racoon Dog .

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25 Junshooji 順正寺 Junsho-Ji
高柳山 With a statue of Amida Nyorai by 恵心僧都 priest Eshin Sozu (Heian period).

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26 Sairenji 西蓮寺 Sairen-ji
Shinshu-otani School

宗誓上人 Shusei, born into a samurai family, became a priest and built the temple in Sakurada-mon. It moved to Toranomon, Mita, then to Karasuyama in 1939. There is a grave of Kokugakuin Kugayama School.
There is also a unique temple gate with tsuijibei 築地塀 Tsuiji-style fence.
Sairen-ji HP : - reference source : sairen99.cocolog-nifty.com-

. tsuijibei 築地塀 Tsuiji fence - Introduction .

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Maps are available from Okubo Sekizai :
4-14-10, Minamikarasuyama, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo
- reference : ohkubo-sekizai.co.jp/teramachi/english



- reference : karasuyama teramachi -
- reference : 烏山 寺町 -
- reference : wikipedia -

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. Edo bakufu 江戸幕府 The Edo Government .

. Famous Places and Powerspots of Edo 江戸の名所 .

. Doing Business in Edo - 商売 - Introduction .

. shokunin 職人 craftsman, craftsmen, artisan, Handwerker .

. senryu, senryū 川柳 Senryu poems in Edo .

. Japanese Architecture - Interior Design - The Japanese Home .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .


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- - - - - #karasuyama #teramachi #templetown #edopilgrims - - - -
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12/10/2016

The Edo Clan

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. Persons and People of Edo - Personen .
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The Edo Clan of the Musashi Taira 武蔵江戸氏 Musashi Edo-Shi

They lived in the hamlet 江戸郷 Edo Go, their Homeland in the Musashi Plain. It was located in the
日比谷の入江 Hibiya no Irie inlet.
Edo 江戸 means "estuary", lit. "inlet door", "entrance to the inlet".

Other clans who lived in the Edo area before Tokugawa Ieyasu established the Bakufu government:



畠山氏 Hatakeyama clan in 深谷 Fukaya
河越氏 Kawagoe clan in 川越 Kawagoe
豊島氏 Toyoshima clan in 川口 Kawaguchi


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- quote
The Edo clan were a minor offshoot of the Taira clan,
and first fortified the settlement known as Edo, which would later become Tokyo. The Imperial Palace now stands at this location.
During the Azuchi-Momoyama period, the clan was renamed the 武蔵喜多見氏 Musashi Kitami clan.
The clan originated in Chichibu in Musashi Province (now Saitama Prefecture). In the late 12th century,
江戸重継 Edo Shigetsugu (Chichibu Shigetsugu) moved south and fortified the little hill at Edo, located where the Sumida River enters Tokyo Bay. This area later became the Honmaru and Ninomaru portions of Edo Castle. There, the Edo grew in military strength under the second patriarch, Edo Shigenaga.

In August 1180, Shigenaga attacked Muira Yoshizumi, an ally of the rival Minamoto clan. Three months later, he switched sides just as Minamoto Yoritomo entered Musashi. Shigenaga assisted the Minamoto in overthrowing the Taira in Kyoto. In return, Yoritomo granted Shigenaga seven new estates in Musashi Province, including Kitami in what is now Tokyo's western Setagaya Ward.

Records show that in 1457, Edo Shigeyasu surrendered his main base at Edo to Ota Dokan. Dokan was a vassal of the powerful Ōgigayatsu branch of the Uesugi clan under Uesugi Sadamasa. Sadamasa was the Kanto-Kanrei for the Ashikaga. Dokan built Edo castle on the site. The Edo clan then moved to Kitami.

In 1593, in a pledge of obedience to Tokugawa Ieyasu, Edo Katsutada changed the clan name to Kitami. Katsutada was employed by the first and second Tokugawa shoguns, reaching the position of Magistrate of Sakai, south of Osaka. Katsutada's grandson-in-law, Shigemasa, found favor with the fifth shogun Tokugawa Tsunayoshi. He rose from the position of hatamoto, with a stipend of one thousand koku, to sobayonin, or "Grand Chamberlain", with a stipend of twenty thousand. It was an influential post, responsible for relaying messages between the shogun and his senior councilors. He was also awarded a large domain in 1686. However, the clan's fortunes suddenly plummeted. In 1689, Shigemasa's nephew violated the Shogunate taboo on bloodshed. Shigemasa had to forfeit his status and property and was banished to Ise, where he died in 1693 at age 36. The 500-year-old Edo clan essentially ceased as a recognized clan.
Tombstones of several generations of the clan are at 慶元寺 Keigen-Ji, a Buddhist temple founded in 1186 by Edo Shigenaga, in Kitami.
The name later changed to 常陸江戸氏 Hitachi Edo-Shi.
- source : wikipedia



江戸重長 Edo Taro Shigenaga  
was the second head of the Edo clan. He first settled and lent his name to the fishing village Edo that eventually grew to become Tokyo.
He was also known as Edo Taroo 江戸太郎 Edo Taro.
In 1180, Shigenaga was asked by Minamoto Yoritomo to cooperate in his uprising against rule of the Taira in Kyoto. Hesitant at first, Shigenaga eventually helped Yoritomo overthrow the Taira rule. Yoritomo granted Shigenaga seven new estates in Musashi Province, including Kitami in what is now Tokyo's western Setagaya Ward.

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source : 4travel.jp/travelogue/10825822

Graves of the Musashi Kitami Clan - 江戸氏之墓所
慶元寺 Keigen-Ji - see below

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- quote -
The ones who got there first
Four centuries before Tokugawa Ieyasu arrived at Edo, a fierce band of mounted warriors had already fortified the hill where Ieyasu would build his magnificent Edo Castle, and on which the Imperial Palace now stands.

In the late 12th century, the Edo clan, as these warriors called themselves, had moved south from Chichibu in present-day Saitama Prefecture led by their patriarch, Edo Shigetsugu. Seizing Edo, they rapidly built up their military presence in the southern Kanto Plain to such a point that, in 1180, Shigenaga, the second clan head, was asked by Minamoto Yoritomo (1147-99) to cooperate in his uprising against the great Taira family in Kyoto.

Shigenaga was not easily persuaded, but eventually lent his power to Yoritomo in overthrowing Taira rule. In appreciation, Yoritomo granted Shigenaga seven new estates in Musashi Province, including Kitami in what is now Tokyo’s western Setagaya Ward.

Little is known about the Edo clan in the turbulent Kamakura Period that began with Yoritomo’s founding of a shogunate in that city in 1192; nor do we know of their fate during the Kyoto-based shogunate known as the Muromachi Period, that ran from 1338-1573. However, records show that in 1457, Edo Shigeyasu surrendered his main base at Edo to Ota Dokan (1432-86), a vassal of Uesugi Sadamasa, Governor of the Kanto Plain, and moved to Kitami. Dokan then built a castle on the site with views of Mount Fuji and Edo Bay, before being killed by an assassin sent by his own master in 1486. The castle was then abandoned until it was taken over by Ieyasu in 1590.

In a pledge of obedience to Ieyasu, Edo Katsutada changed the clan name to Kitami in 1593. Katsutada was employed by the first and second shoguns, reaching the position of Magistrate of Sakai, south of Osaka.

His grandson-in-law, Shigemasa, bathed in the special favor of the fifth shogun and rose to the rank of daimyo by 1682. Promoted to a sobayonin (grand chamberlain), whose influential role was to relay messages between the shogun and his senior councilors, he was awarded a further large domain in 1686.

From this zenith of happiness, however, Shigemasa’s fortunes plummeted — and with them, those of the Edo clan. In 1689, Shigemasa’s nephew violated the shogunal taboo on bloodshed and the family was held collectively responsible. As punishment, Shigemasa forfeited his status and all property and was banished to Ise, where he died in 1693 at age 36. His kin was similarly punished, and with that the 500-year-old Edo clan vanished.

To this day, however, memories of the first possessor of Edo linger on at Keigen-ji in Kitami, Setagaya Ward, an impressive Buddhist temple founded in 1186 by Edo Shigenaga. Tombstones of several generations of the clan, some quite eroded but others recently renovated, huddle together in a corner of the graveyard, tied eternally by their invisible bond of kinship.
- source : Japan Times 2003 - Sumiko Enbutsu -

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Keigenji 慶元寺 Keigen-Ji
永劫山 花林院 慶元寺 Eigosan Karin-In Keigen-Ji

世田谷区喜多見4-17-1 / 4 Chome-17-1 Kitami, Setagaya ward
浄土宗 Jodo Sect.

Apart from the main temple hall, it has a 鐘楼 bell tower and a 三重堂 three-story pagoda.


source and more photos : tesshow.jp/setagaya

The main statue is 阿弥陀如来 Amida Nyorai.
Edo Taro Shigenaga founded this temple, then called 岩戸山大沢院東福寺 Tofuku-Ji in 1186, which then belonged to the 天台宗 Tendai sect.
In 1451 it was relocated to 成城(元喜多見) Seijo (Moto Kitami) and found its final place in 1468.
In 1540, the priest 空誉上人 / 空与(空與)/ 空与守欣上人 Kuyo Shonin revitalized the temple, which had lost its importance. The name changed 上山華林院慶元寺 and now it belonges to the Jodo Sect.
In 1636, Shogun Iemitsu awarded the temple with land of 10石 (about 1ha(10000㎡), annexing 6 temples in the neighborhood.

Number 4 in the pilgrimage to 33 Kannon temples along the Tamagawa 多摩川三十三ヶ所観音霊場.




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Kitami eki 喜多見駅 Kitami station
on the Odakyu Railway Line, on the border between Setagaya Ward and Komae City.
The name of the area,
Kitami
, (also written 北見)
is thought to originate from an ancient Ainu word meaning "flat, wooded place".
- quote wikipedia -



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- Some further History -
... The Kantō Plain appears to have first been populated in the Late Jōmon Period sometime after 3100 BC. ...
... Kofun Period (200-500 AD) : It seems that around the 300’s, Kantō became a vassal state of the Yamato Court. There are more than 200 Kofun in the Tōkyō Metropolis.
丸山古墳 Maruyama Kofun “Round Mountain” Kofun is in 芝公園 Shiba Kōen park ...


... “A feudal warlord named Ōta Dōkan came into the small fishing village of Edo and built his castle there.”...
... “Though it was once an insignificant village in the marshy wetlands,
Tokugawa Ieyasu transformed Edo into a glorious capital befitting of the shōgun.”...
... The Edo clan still had a residence in Kitami, which is present day Setagawa Ward. In light of Tokugawa Ieyasu’s dominance over the area, it would be presumptuous (and confusing) for a clan to retain the name of the capital city when a new daimyō, appointed by the unifier of Japan, controlled that city. So in 1593, taking an oath of submission and fealty to Tokugawa Ieyasu, the last Edo Clan daimyō gave up the name Edo and assumed the name, Kitami, which was where their primary holdings were. ...
... In 1693, the direct family line, no longer Edo but Kitami, was extinguished after the banishment of Kitami Shigeyasu to Ise when his grandson murdered somebody or something.
... At the height of Tokugawa power, the castle is said to have been the biggest in the world and the city was likely the most populous.
- More details and history about the name of EDO -
- source : japanthis.com/2013 -

. Oota Dookan 太田道灌 Ota Dokan (1432 - 1486) .

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- - - - - Now we come to September 3rd, 1868 :
慶応4年7月17日(西暦では1868年9月3日)
Edo o shooshite Tōkyō to nasu shoosho 江戸を称して東京と為すの詔書
江戸ヲ称シテ東京ト為スノ詔書


Imperial Edict Renaming Edo to Tōkyō.

私は、今政治に自ら裁決を下すこととなり、全ての民をいたわっている。
江戸は東国で第一の大都市であり、四方から人や物が集まる場所である。当然、私自らその政治をみるべきである。よって、以後江戸を東京と称することとする。これは、私が国の東西を同一視するためである。
国民はこの私の意向を心に留めて行動しなさい。

"I at this time settle all matters of state myself in the interest of the people.
Edo is the largest city in the eastern provinces, a place in which things gather from every direction. It were well that
I should personally oversee its governance. Therefore from this time on I shall call it“Tokyo”(Eastern Capital).
This is so that I might oversee all affairs in the land equally, from east to west.
Let the people heed this my will."

- reference source : wikipedia -

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- reference : Edo Shigenaga -
- reference : Kitami Edo Tokyo -

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. Edo bakufu 江戸幕府 The Edo Government .

. Famous Places and Powerspots of Edo 江戸の名所 .

. Doing Business in Edo - 商売 - Introduction .


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11/28/2015

shinbutsu in Edo

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Famous Places and Powerspots of Edo 江戸の名所 .
. Temples of Edo 江戸のお寺 - INFO .
. Shrines of Edo 江戸の神社 - INFO .
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shinbutsu in Edo 江戸の神仏 Kami and Hotoke in Edo

shinbutsu shūgō 神仏習合 - Syncretism of Shinto and Buddhism
shinbutsu bunri 神仏分離 - Separation of Shinto and Buddhism.

. shinbutsu 神仏 kami to hotoke .
- Introduction -


探訪・大江戸の神仏 - 日本のこころ - 1995


. shinbutsu 神仏と伝説 legends about Kami and Hotoke - the Deities of Japan .


. Jiun Onkoo 慈雲飲光 Priest Jiun Onko .
(1718 – 1804/1805)
founder of 雲伝神道 Unden Shinto // 葛城神道 Katsuragi Shinto
..... Jiun held that no distinction existed between Shinto and esoteric Buddhism, and that it would be impossible to learn the essence of Shinto without also understanding esoteric Buddhism.

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- - - The three deities most feared in Japan:

. Shinigami 死神 God of Death "Grim Reaper" .

. Binbogami, Binboo Gami 貧乏神 Bimbogami, God of Poverty .

. Yakubyoogami 疫病神 Yakubyogami, Deity of Diseases .
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- - - - - ABC list of Buddhist Temples and Shinto Shrines - - - - -

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- - - - - Chooonji 長遠寺 Choon-Ji 大田区南馬込



如意輪観音 Nyoirin Kannon, 地蔵菩薩坐像 Jizo Bosatsu
不動明王 Fudo Myo-O 地蔵菩薩 - Jizo Bosatsu


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. Fujizuka, Fuji-zuka 富士塚 Mound to honor Mount Fujisan .

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- - - - - Hachiman Sha 八幡社 江東区

Once on the day of the Shrine festival, a mother came with her child of about 3 years. When she wanted to pass over the bridge, the child suddenly begun to cry, so she stopped without crossing and the child stopped crying soon.
A short while later the bridge collapsed and about 1000 people were injured.
The mother felt it was the help of the Deities that saved her life.


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- - - - - Kaminakazato Fudo 上中里不動尊
Tokyo, Kita, Kaminakazato, 1 Chome−47−34


摩利支天 Marishi-Ten



不動明王 Fudo Myo-O


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- - - - - Koomyooin 光明院 Komyo-In / 上荻2丁目


Fudo Myo-O 不動明王 in the bamboo grove


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- - - - - Mejiro Fudo 目白不動尊金乗院 Konjo-In


Dragon sword of Fudo Myo-O 倶梨伽羅不動


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- - - - - Oota Jinja 太田神社 - 高木神社 Takagi Jinja
Ōta-ku, Chūō, 6 Chome−3 太田神社

. Kuroyami Tennyo 黒闇天女 Lady Ten Deity of the Darkness .
... the Binbogami of this shrine turned into a Deity to bring good luck, Fuku no Kami,
福の神になった貧乏神.
Kuroyami Ten 黒闇天 (こくあんてん) Kokuan Ten
a Buddhist Deity of the Tenbu 天部 the Devas of India .


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- - - - - Yanagimori Jinja 柳森神社 - Chiyoda, Kanda

. O-tanuki san おたぬきさん the honorable Tanuki .

ta o nuku 他を抜く
"tanuki" can also be read "ta-nuki,"
or pulling away from the crowd, a symbol of victory.



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- - - - - reference - - - - -


江戸の法華信仰 - 望月真澄 Mochizuki Shincho
江戸で
〈祖師〉といえば〈日蓮〉を指すほど人気を博した法華信仰。町人の願いに応えた現世利益の数々やその信仰形態を豊富な写真とともに紹介する、江戸の法華信仰ガイドブック。
第1章 江戸の神仏と信仰
第2章 江戸の神仏の儀礼
第3章 祖師と守護神の霊場
第4章 加持祈禱の隆盛
第5章 法華信仰の寺院・仏像・信徒
第6章 江戸の巡拝信仰
- source : kokusho.co.jp/np -

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江戸の神仏しめくくり Edo no Shinbutsu Meguri
目白不動尊金乗院
根生院 - 南蔵院 - 亮朝院 - 津久井町の専念寺
願行寺 - 根津神社 - 東覚寺 - 大久寺 - 圓勝寺 - 上中里不動尊 / 上中里庚申堂
宗福寺 - 長遠寺 - 長遠寺の隣りの八幡神社 - 天祖神社 - 北野神社 - 熊野神社/南馬込 - 湯殿神社 - 新井宿薬師堂 - 大田区/本門寺 /妙見堂 - 十寄神社 - 遍照院
various Fujizuka
①船堀の富士塚(日枝神社) / ②桑川の富士塚(桑川神社)/ ③長島の富士塚(香取神社)/ ④今井の富士塚(香取神社)/ ⑤下鎌田の富士塚(豊田神社)/ ⑥上鎌田の富士塚(天祖神社)
江古田富士 - 庚申堂 - 下練馬富士 - 小御嶽神社 (Tengu) - 石観音堂
石神井 (Shakujii) : 禅定院 - 三宝寺 - 御嶽神社 -
杉並区 Sugita : 光明院 - 観泉寺 - 白山神社 - 西方寺 - 真盛寺 - 慈眼寺 - 宝仙寺 - 心法寺 -
- a page with many amazing photos !
- source : nobuhiro_suzu -

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うわさの神仏 ー 江戸TOKYO陰陽百景
3 volumes by 加門七海 Kamon Nanami

2 行ってみます?
今戸神社―かわいい?巨大招き猫が鎮座 - Imado Jinja
銀座八丁のお稲荷さん―狐口密集地帯!?銀座を行く - Ginza no Inari
秋葉原―最先端のPC街、その主は天狗だった  - Akihabara no Tengu

3 行きたいなら止めません。
渋谷―犬が南向きゃ、魔物がのさばる!? - Shibuya - dogs and monsters
池袋―一度ハマると抜けられぬ。「袋」に溜まるモノあれこれ - Ikebukuro and bags
上野―旧幕軍のサムライが徘徊!?お化けの宴会にご用心 - Ueno - old samurai
at amazon com


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. Ginza Hatcho Jinja 銀座八丁神社 Shrines in 8 Ginza districts .

1.幸稲荷神社 Saiwai Inari Jinja
2.銀座稲荷神社 Ginza Inari Jinja
3.龍光不動尊 "Fashion" Ryuko Fudo Son
4.朝日稲荷神社 Asahi Inari Jinja
5.銀座出世地蔵尊 Ginza Shusse Jizo
6.宝童稲荷神社 Hodo Inari Jinja
7.あづま稲荷神社 Azuma Inari Jinja
8.靍護稲荷神社 Kakugo Inari Jinja 
9.成功稲荷神社 Seiko Inari Jinja
10.豊岩稲荷神社 Toyoiwa Inari Jinja
- and 八官神社 Hachikan Jinja // 宝珠稲荷神社 Hoju Inari Jinja


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- - - To join me on facebook, click the image !

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. Japanese Architecture - Interior Design - The Japanese Home .

. Famous Places and Powerspots of Edo 江戸の名所 .

. - Doing Business in Edo - 商売 - Introduction .

. shokunin 職人 craftsman, craftsmen, artisan, Handwerker .

. senryu, senryū 川柳 Senryu poems in Edo .

. densetsu 伝説 Japanese Legends - Introduction .


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]- - - - - #shinbutsuedo - - - -
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10/12/2015

Kamimeguro district

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Famous Places and Powerspots of Edo 江戸の名所 .
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Kamimeguro, Kami-Meguro 上目黒    

. Meguro 目黒区 Meguro-ku, Meguro ward .

Meguro was home to the hawks and falcons hunting grounds (takajo 鷹所)of the Shogun, first developed by Tokugawa Ieyasu himself, because he was an avid hunter.




. 幕府放鷹制度 Bakufu government rules about takagari 鷹狩 .

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- quote
Kami-Meguro - The Shogun's Hawk-Hunting Grounds
A long procession of men streams down the country road. Today I am going to take you along with Matsudaira-dono and a large party of his retainers to the western fringe of the city. The shogun is on one of his annual hawk-hunting expeditions, and has asked Matsudaira-dono to come along for a few days and take part.

The shogun has seven taka-jo (hawking estates) strategically located in a ring around the city. From these estates, it is possible to get quickly to any of the major farming villages and small towns in the greater Edo vicinity. The location of hawk-hunting estates is very important, and the first shogun, Ieyasu, spent a great deal of time in planning them. The one that you are going to, in Meguro, is well placed at the center of a busy farming region, and it can serve as a base of operations to visit all of the farming villages in the area. It might seem strange that the head of the bakufu (government) pays so much attention to hawking, but this is because hunting has other roles besides simply a pastime.

Hawking has been a popular sport among the nobles and high-ranking samurai for many centuries. At first, however, it simply involved an overnight outing to the countryside, where each of the participants would show off the hunting skills of the eagles and hawks that they raised and trained. However, during the sengoku jidai (the age of warring states), hawk hunting began to take on several other purposes. Hawk hunting expeditions would often last for months at a time, and the daimyo and high-level samurai would cover wide areas of their domains during their hunt.

The leaders discovered that hawk-hunting gave them a convenient excuse to show up unannounced in villages throughout their territory. This allowed them to see for themselves how daily life was in the countryside they ruled, and make sure that everything was all right in the area. If farmers were cheating on their taxes, he would often find evidence when making an unexpected visit. On the other hand, if the local administrators were treating the local people unfairly, the daimyo could ask the people about their conditions as he passed through the villages on one of his hawk-hunting expeditions. However, since the daimyo was just "out hunting", the people would not have any reason to complain, or feel upset that he was spying on them.

When Tokugawa Ieyasu became shogun, he made hawking a very formal part of his yearly activities. He set up hawk-hunting manors throughout his own territory, and encouraged the other daimyo to do so as well. Several times a year he would go on expeditions, and in addition to his hunting companions and hawk-tenders, he also brought along accountants and clerks to check carefully all the local tax and production records of the towns they travel through during their hunts. The shipments of tax rice could be checked and compared with the size of the fields in the town, to see if everyone was paying the proper amount.

In addition, Ieyasu passed a law that allows any farmer or peasant to come forward and make a complaint or petition while the shogun is travelling through their village on a hawk hunt. This way, if the local people have a complaint about how the local government officials are treating them, they can go directly to the shogun with the problem, and don't have to worry that the local leaders might punish them for speaking out. All of Ieyasu's successors have continued the tradition of hawk hunting. The current shogun goes out hawking about six or seven times a year, usually for at least a week.

Although hawking expeditions involve quite a lot of "unofficial business", they are also a chance for the shogun to relax from the dull routine of life at the castle. The shogun is the most powerful man in Japan, but he has to answer to the demands of many different groups -- the Imperial court in Kyoto, each of the local daimyo, the leaders of major temples and shrines throughout the country, the local administrators in Edo, and so on. Back in Ieyasu's day, these demands were still limited, but nowadays the shogun's life seems to be one meeting after another. Hawk hunting gives him a chance to get out of the city and away from all the long, formal meetings. A chance to enjoy the open countryside, fresh air and sunshine!


- 名所江戸百景 -
元不二(元富士)"Old Mount Fujisan" and 新冨士 "New Mount Fujisan"


Hawk hunting is not very strenuous for the shogun and the daimyo who accompany him. However, their main purpose in going on a hawking expedition, in addition to the opportunity to relax and enjoy nature, is to view the farms and villages in the area and study the landscape. Back in the days when daimyo were still fighting one another, the expedition would include many scouts and spies, who would try to find locations for a strong fort, or try to see what was going on in neighboring territories. Nowadays, the men are mainly looking for fields of crops that the farmers did not mention when paying their taxes, or examining new areas where the land might be cleared and made suitable for farming.

Each of the shogun's seven hawking estates, or taka-jo ("taka" means "hawk") is managed by a staff of several hawk supervisors (taka-mi). Their job is to raise the hawks and train them to hunt for small birds and rabbits. They also keep an eye on the local villages and make sure they follow the rules. There are many special rules for the areas surrounding the hawk-hunting estates. For example, local people living near the estates are not allowed to have dogs or cats as pets. They also have to get special permission if they need to do any building work, and usually the permission is only granted at certain times of the year when the noise will not disturp the game birds and animals that live in the area. Most of these rules are intended to ensure that there is plenty of game to hunt. Because of these strict rules, the areas of farmland immediately surrounding the hawking manors are filled with birds and game. In fact, as your company crosses the fields and meadows, flocks of game birds can be seen even right near the homes of the local villagers.

The shogun and his companions ride their horses at the front of the long procession. Their hawks are perched on their arms, the head covered by a tiny hood until it is time for the bird to hunt. When the lead riders reach a clearing that looks like a good place for hunting, they dismount and then send a signal back to the servants and assistants who are following them. The assistants then fan out through the woods and begin moving slowly toward the place where the shogun and his companions are waiting.


富士山麓の鷹狩り - 喜多川歌麿 Kitagawa Utamaro

The birds and rabbits in the woods run away from the servants, who make a lot of noise as they walk through the woods. The line of servants continues to move toward the clearing, and eventually the game birds have to fly out into the open to get away. As soon as a game bird flies out into the clearing, one of the riders releases his hawk. The hawk flies swiftly after its prey, soaring into the sky and then wheeling to strike. The hawks are well trained, and they rarely miss a kill. The hawk soars like an arrow towards its prey, striking quickly and bringing down its victim. The assistants collect the dead birds or rabbits once the hawk has made the kill, and put them in a large sack. The game that the hawks catch today will be served to the shogun and his companions at dinner tonight.

The hunt covers a wide area of fields and woodland, stopping many times both to hunt and to speak to local farmers and gather information. After a long day of jogging over hills and fields to keep up with the men on horseback, the guards and servants are exhausted. While the shogun, and the other high-ranking officials dine in the taka-jo's main house, the servants and retainers will roast quail or ducks over the fire. After dinner, they will sit by the fire, lie back smoking their pipes, and gaze at the sparkling stars before dropping off to sleep by the fire.
- source : Edomatsu


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- reference source : wheatbaku.exblog.jp -

Many shoguns liked to go for takagari 鷹狩り hunting with hawks and falcons. During these outings, they used to rest and eat outside.
These places were called (with the honorable 御 O at the beginning):

御腰掛 okoshikake, 御立寄所 otachiyorijo, 御仲休所, 御休憩所 okyusokujo - "resting place"
御膳所 ozenjo、御弁当所 obentojo - "place to eat"
御小休所 oshonbensho - "place to use a toilet"

The best known of these places are shrines and temples :
隅田村の木母寺 Sumida village, Mokubo-Ji - 木下川村の浄光寺 Kinegawa village, Joko-Ji
音羽町の護持院 Otowa village, Goji-In - 中目黒の祐天寺 Naka-Meguro, Yutenji
品川の東海寺 Shinagawa, Tofuku-Ji - 鈴ヶ森八幡 Suzugamori Hachiman - 深川の永代寺 Fukagawa, Eitai-Ji
亀戸村の亀戸天神・普門院 Kameido Tenjin, Fumon-In
. Shinshooji 真性寺 / 眞性寺 Shinsho-Ji . - Sugamo

千駄木の鷹部屋 Sendagi Falconry - 雑司ヶ谷の鷹部屋 Zoshigaya Falconry - 駒場の御用屋敷 Komaba Falconry
上中里村の御用屋敷 Kaminakamura Falconry - 小菅村の伊奈半左衛門屋敷 Kosuge village, estate of Ina Hanzaemon - 中川番所 Nakagawa Guard House


. Toofukuji 東福寺 Tofuku-Ji .
ozensho 御膳所 "place to eat" for the Shogun

. Mokuboji 木母寺と梅若丸伝説 Mokubo-Ji and Umewakamaru Legend .

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下目黒 (しもめぐろ) Shimomeguro - 葛飾北斎 Hokusai

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- - - - - H A I K U and S E N R Y U - - - - -

. takagari 鷹狩 hunting with hawks and falcons .
falconry - ... hooyoo 放鷹(ほうよう)
takano 鷹野(たかの)open field with hawks
takajoo 鷹匠 (たかじょう) Takajo, keeper, trainer of the falcons and hawks
... takashi 鷹師(たかし)
- - kigo for all winter - -

naitogari 鳴鳥狩 ないとがり hunting and training with hawks
asa takagari 朝鷹狩(あさたかがり)
asatogari 朝鳥狩(あさとがり)、
oboegari 覚狩(おぼえがり)training the hawk
tomarigari 泊り狩(とまりがり)staying in the mountain (hut for training)
tomariyama, tomari-yama 泊り山(とまりやま)
kikisuedori 聞すえ鳥(ききすえどり)
misuedori 見すえ鳥(みすえどり)
suzuko 鈴子(すずこ) little bell
suzuko sasu taka 鈴子挿す鷹(すずこさすたか)
tsugi ootaka 継尾の鷹(つぎおのたか)
shirao no taka 白尾の鷹(しらおのたか)hawk with a white tail
shirafu no taka 白斑の鷹(しらふのたか)hawk with white spots
Hunting with hawks is done in winter, but the training of the animals starts in spring. They get a bell on one foot and have to learn how to hunt and come back to the master. Often the hawker and his animal stay in a mountain hut for a while together during this time.
- - kigo for late spring - -

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. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

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愛知県 Aichi 津島市 Tsushima

kitsune 狐 fox
The 尾張大納言 Lord of Owari
尾張大納言が津島で鷹狩りをしていた時、薬の調合のため狐の生肝を所望した。そこで餌指の市兵衛が狐を捕まえ、残りの肉と皮までもらいうけた。すると清洲にいた彼の妻にその狐が憑き、恨みを晴らそうとしたという。それを聞いた大納言は、狐は霊獣なので道理が通じると考え、家臣の真島権左衛門を派遣し、死すべき命を人間の薬のために殺したのだから喜ばしい事ではないかと狐を諭した。すると狐は我らのような畜類に、大君の厳命を頂けるのはありがたいと言って憑くのをやめたという。

ある時、夜更けより尾張の太守が鷹狩りに御出になった。すると山の奥より「申の歳申の月申の日に猿を殺した尾張殿はどこだ」という怪しい声がし、総勢が動けなくなった。そこで尾張太守は強気の士を呼びよせると、士は「何やつぞ」と叫びながら睨みつけると、妖怪は去ったと見えて夜が明けたようになり皆は正気に戻った。

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愛媛県 Ehime 温泉郡 Onsen district

. shichinin misaki 七人ミサキ Nananin Misaki Legends .
a group of persons who died in an accident or in unnatural circumstances

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- 西岡 Nichioka and 重信町 Shigenobu

Once a family of seven went hunting for hawks, (which was forbidden), and even ate the hawk. They were executed by chopping off their heads. Later if people walk by that ground, they will soon encounter some misfortune. The souls of the seven are now venerated at a small Hokora sanctuary as
七社権現 Shichisha Gongen - The Gongen Deities from Seven Shrines .
(See their photo in the link given above.)


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福岡県 Fukuoka 北九州市 Kita-Kyushu

gozutennoo 牛頭天王 at Ogura Yasaka Jinja
小倉八坂神社の祭礼の創始についての伝説。細川越中守忠興が鷹狩のとき、不動山で休息した。そこに1つの石祠はあったが、忠興が携えた杖で祠の扉を開けると1羽の霊鷹が中より飛び出し忠興の両目を蹴った。痛みがひどく直ちに帰邸し手当てをしたが直らない。これは牛頭天王の神罰と恐怖して1社を建立し祭りを興行し神楽湯立をするとお願込をして漸く右目だけ治った。それでももう片目が治らないので神前で能興行をすると祈ったところ漸く治った。


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栃木県 Tochigi

下野の国の阿曽沼に鷹を使う者がいた。ある時鷹狩りをして、鴛の雄を取って帰った。その夜の夢に品の良い女が現れて、怨み深い様子で泣いて、「なぜ私の夫を殺したのか」という。「そんなことはしていない」というと、「確かに今日召し取った」といい、歌を詠じて飛び立つのを見ると鴛の雌であった。驚いて朝見れば、昨日の雄と嘴をあわせて雌が死んでいた。男はそれを見て発心して出家した。
.
殺生を好んで鷹を使うものがいた。ある時鷹狩りの帰りに鴛の雄を捕まえ餌袋に入れて帰った。その夜、夢にうつくしい女房が現れ、夫を殺したと嘆いた。そのようなことはしていないと否定したが、女房は和歌を詠んでふっと立ち上がった。それを見ると鴛の雌であった。驚いて哀れに思っていると朝になり、昨日の雄と嘴を食い合って死んでいる雌がいた。これを見て発心し出家した。

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東京都 Tokyo

In Edo in the district 通銀町二丁目 lived a merchant called 堯順 Takayasu. He had employed the child of a hunter who was responsible to provide food for the Falconry in Hachioji. But this child died of an epidemy. They washed the body and wanted to cut its hair, but the sissors did not cut a thing. Then Takayasu looked closer, he saw a beak of a bird had grown at the head, almost as hard as a stone. This was around the year 1680.

samuhara さむはら / サムハラ
In 1652, the Shogun went hawk hunting. The hawk caught a large goose. There were four 文字 letters written on the breast of the bird.
The letter was awase 袷 (lined kimono).

その雁の胸には四つの文字が書いてあり、文字は「袷」とあった。

- reference : 5 legends with さむはら samuhara -

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- reference : Nichibun Yokai Database -
9 legends about 鷹狩 takagari (00)

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. Famous Places and Powerspots of Edo 江戸の名所 .

. Doing Business in Edo - 商売 - Introduction .

. shokunin 職人 craftsman, craftsmen, artisan, Handwerker .

. senryu, senryū 川柳 Senryu poems in Edo .

. densetsu 伝説 Japanese Legends - Introduction .


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8/20/2013

Buson - visiting temples

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. Yosa Buson 与謝蕪村 in Edo .
(1715-1783)

Visiting some temples with Buson.
The temple bell (kane 鐘 ) is extra.

Japanese Temple Bells


. WKD : tera 寺 temple, temples, Tempel .



under construction
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furudera ni kibigara o taku bojitsu kana

At an old temple
Millet chaff they burn--
At sunset

Tr. Nelson/Saito



古寺の藤あさましき落葉哉
furudera no fuji asamashiki ochiba kana
(1777)

Wisteria at an aged temple
Miserable--
Fallen leaves.

Tr. Nelson/Saito



furudera no kure mashiro nari soba no hana
(1777)

at the temple
at sunset the white colors
of buckwheat flowers . . .

Tr. Gabi Greve

The cut marker KANA is at the end of line 3.



古寺やほうろく捨つる芹の中
furudera ya hooroku suteru seri no naka

this old temple -
horoku dished are thrown out
into the dropwort fields

Tr. Gabi Greve

Buson at Mibu Temple 壬生寺

. WKD : kawarake-nage かはらけなげ throwing dishes .


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花ちりて木間の寺と成にけり
hana chirite ko no ma no tera to nari ni keri
(1769)

The cherry-blossoms having fallen,
The temple belongs
To the branches.

Tr. Blyth



With the cherry blossoms gone
The temple is glimpsed
Through twigs and branches.

Tr. Miura


Cherry blossoms gone--
The temple, its former self
Among the trees.

Tr. Nelson/Saito


With blossoms fallen
in spaces between the twigs
a temple has appeared.

Tr. Sawa/ Shiffert



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hata utsu ya ko no ma no tera no kane-kuyoo

tilling the field;
from the forest,
the temple bell tolls

Tr. Haldane



hata utsu ya mine no oboo no tori no koe

tilling the fields -
from the mountain temple
the voice of a cock

Tr. Gabi Greve


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寒月に木を割寺の男哉
kangetsu ni ki o waru tera no otoko kana

under the cold moon
a man of the temple
chops firewood . . .

Tr. Gabi Greve

The cut marker KANA is at the end of line 3.
kangetsu 寒月 lit. "moon in the cold", winter moon.

- quote
In Buson zenbu, they guess it was probably a thematic, or 兼題句 kendai-ku because of another he wrote soon before captioned kangetsu. It is among the 1 in 5 or so of Buson's ku i mark as somewhat interesting because i felt -- here, i agree with the commentators -- the dry crack of the ax and splitting apart evoke the cold light shed by the moon.
However, i also think it significant the ku ends in the man (men) as subject making him (or them) more of a theme than would be the case had the man been in the middle seven and merely the subject. In English, this difference is hard to make. So, i feel the man himself takes in the quality of the the moon and wood and ax ...
I think it significant that in one version the ki is 薪 maki (firewood/brushwood)while several are ki, just "wood." That is why I felt it was starker reading the Japanese than i would have the "firewood" below.
Of the 4 bks with the ku, including his selfbrushed notebook, ku-chou (just ku, right), only the one with the word hokku included in the booktitle had the word firewood in it.
Robin D. Gill
. discussion of facebook .



寒月や門なき寺の天高し
kangetsu ya mon naki tera no ten takashi
(1768)

cold moon -
a temple without gate and
the high autumn sky

Tr. Gabi Greve

. WKD : kangetsu 寒月(かんげつ)"moon in the cold", moon on a cold night .
kigo for winter

. WKD : ten takashi 天高し "high sky", "high heaven" .
kigo for autumn



kangetsu ya tani ni cha o kumu mine no tera

cold winter moon -
down the valley water is scooped
for the temple at the summit

Tr. Gabi Greve


都人にたらぬふとんや峰の寺
. miyabito ni taranu futon ya mine no tera .




寒月や鋸岩のあからさま

寒月や門をたゝけば沓の音



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momiji shite tera aru sama no kozue kana

The leaves turn scarlet so
There must be a temple
Hidden among the treetops.

Tr. McAuley


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菜の花や摩耶を下れば日の暮るる
. na no hana ya maya o kudareba hi no kururu .

Temple Butsumo Maya San Tooriten Jooji 仏母麻耶山忉利天上寺
Maya san Tenjooji 摩耶山天上寺 Tenjo-Ji. Hyogo

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ootera ni meshi no sukunaki sakura kana
(1769)

at the huge temple
the food is meager
for cherry blossom viewers . . .

Tr. Gabi Greve

The cut marker KANA is at the end of line 3.

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鹿ながら山影門に入日哉
shika nagara yamakage mon ni irihi kana

together with a deer
a mountain's shadow at the temple gate
in the setting sun . . .

Tr. Gabi Greve

The cut marker KANA is at the end of line 3.

. Konpukuji, Konbukuji 金福寺 / 金福寺 temple Konbuku-Ji .
Kyoto

Buson wrote the following haiku at this temple:

耳目肺腸ここに玉巻く芭蕉庵
三度啼きて聞こえずなりぬ鹿の声
鹿ながら山影門に入日哉
畑うつやうごかぬ雲もなくなりぬ
冬ちかし時雨の雲もここよりぞ
我も死して碑にほとりせむ枯尾花

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tenzoo no niwa no kogiku ya ginkakuji
(1777)

the small chrysanthemum flowers
in the garden of the temple cook -
Silver Pavillion

Tr. Gabi Greve


. Ginkajuji 銀閣寺 Ginkaku-Ji, the Silver Pavillion in Kyoto .



. tenzoo 典座 the Zen cook .


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寺寒く樒はみこぼす鼠かなt
tera samuku shikimi hamikobosu nezumi kana

a cold temple
and the mice are gnawing
star anise . . . . .

Tr. Gabi Greve

shikimi
is used to purify the body and soul by monks.

. WKD : shikimi no hana 樒の花 shikimi blossoms .
Skimmia japonica
Illicium anisatum - commonly known as the Japanese star anise


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としひとつ積るや雪の小町寺
toshi hitotsu tsumoru ya yuki no komachidera
(1773)

Another year
Accumulates -- Snow at
Komachi Temple.

Tr. Nelson/Saito


Fudara-Ji 補陀洛寺(小町寺 Komachidera )
. Ono no Komachi 小野 小町 .
c. 825 — c. 900. Waka Poetess and Famous Beauty


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妻も子も寺で物くふ野分かな
tsuma mo ko mo tera de mono kuu nowaki kana
(1783)

mothers and children
eat at the temple
during the typhoon . . .

Tr. Gabi Greve


The cut marker KANA is at the end of line 3.
tsuma mo ko mo lit. "wives and children"

Even in our times in rural Japan, people evacuate to special centers or the local temple during a typhoon.


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裏門の寺に逢着す蓬かな
ura-mon no tera ni hochakusu yomogi kana

At the back gate
of the temple, I arrive to find
a growth of mugwort.

Tr. McAuley



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山寺の硯に早し初氷 
yamadera no suzuri ni hayashi hatsugoori

the ink stone
of this mountain temple has it early -
the first ice

Tr. Gabi Greve




yamadera ya tsuki sokonai no kane kasumu

A mountain temple;
The sound of the bell struck fumblingly,
Vanishing in the haze.

Tr. Blyth


A temple on a mountain--
Its bell struck amiss
In the haze.

Tr.Nelson/Saito


A mountain temple--
a bell struck clumsily
resounds blurred in the fog.

Tr. Sawa/ Shiffert


. WKD : yamadera  山寺 a mountain temple .


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. WKD : Yosa Buson 与謝蕪村 - Introduction .

. Yosa Buson 与謝蕪村 in Edo .

. ABC - List of Buson's works in the WKD .
buson


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1/31/2013

Temples of Edo - INFO

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. Japan - Shrines and Temples - MAIN List .
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 Temples of Edo 江戸のお寺 - INFO





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. Asakusa Kannon 浅草観音 .
Temple Sensooji 浅草寺 Sensoji
fujikoo 富士講 Fujiko , Mount Fuji pilgrims


. Denzuuin 伝通院 Denzu-In, Denzuin - Tokyo .
小石川伝通院 Koishikawa Denzu-In, Dentsu-in, Dentsuin
and the Inari foxes Hakuzosu Inari 伯蔵主稲荷 / 澤蔵司稲荷 Takuzosu Inari


. Fukagawa Fudo Doo 深川不動堂 . Tokyo


. Gofunai 御府内八十八ヶ所霊場 88 Henro Temples in Edo .

. Jooju in 成就院(たこ薬師)Temple Joju-In .
and Tako Yakushi, Meguro, Tokoy


. Karasuyama teramachi 烏山寺町 Karasuyama Temple Town .
Introducing 26 temples in Setagaya ward.


. Keigenji 慶元寺 Keigen-Ji .
and The Edo Clan of the Musashi Taira 武蔵江戸氏 Musashi Edo-Shi

. Koofukuji 弘福寺 Kofuku-Ji . Tokyo


. Mokuboji 木母寺 temple Mokubo-Ji .
and the legend of Umewakamaru 梅若丸伝説

. Narita Fudo 成田不動尊
Temple Shinsho-Ji (Shinshooji) 新勝寺


. Sengakuji - (Senkakuji) 泉岳寺 Sengaku-Ji .
and the story of the 47 Ronin, Chuushingura 忠臣蔵  Chushingura


. Zoojooji, Zōjō-Ji 増上寺 Zojo-Ji .
- the family temple of the Tokugawa family

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Tokyo Daibutsu 東京大仏 Great Buddha of Tokyo
Joorenji 乗蓮寺 Joren-Ji
板橋区赤塚5-28 / 5 Chome-28 Akatsuka, Itabashi ward



- quote -
... this temple was only available to Japan’s ruling family - the Tokugawa Shogunate - before their 268 years of dynastic rule ended with the Meiji Restoration.
These days the temple is known for its more recent addition - the Tokyo Daibutsu.
Upon completion in 1980, it was the third largest sitting Buddha in Japan (at 13m it’s only a mere meter shorter than it' more famous Kamakura cousin).
Twenty two tons of once shiny golden metal has oxidized into a jet-black patina that exudes a powerful serenity. The bronze statue sits meditating in a grand hilltop compound that also houses a huge wooden temple, a Chinese pagoda, a pond of hungry pouting carp, a traditional family dwelling, a scattering of statues, and a graveyard.
There is an impressive example of a traditional temple bell used to ring in the New Year, with a Buddhist countdown of 108 strikes that serve to cleanse the 108 delusions of mankind.
Nearby stand a set of stone Shichifukujin, or seven gods of good fortune. Ebisu, Daikokuten, Bishamonten, Benzaiten (or Benten), Fukurokuju, Jurojin, and Hotei are the deities of prosperity in business, the kitchen, battle, arts and sciences, long life, wisdom, and overall happiness.
... the small temple shop provides a tiny guardian deity to petition the larger Jizo, already crowded with hundreds of statues representing wishes requested.
A gaman no oni - literally a patient demon - will shoulder your worries for the price of a prayer.
- snip snip -
The imposing presence of the Daibutsu dwarfs the temple’s historical significance.
Commissioned in 1977 by the then 88-year-old chief monk, the figure took three years to complete. Built to comfort the souls of those who lost their lives in the 1923 earthquake and WWII, he hoped it might also assuage his own haunting memories of the death and destruction of both calamities. Perhaps this also extends to all those who died in the fierce battles that once raged over the old Akatsuka castle, the site the temple now occupies. Ironically, while it has become a cherished local landmark, succession of custodianship is a problem.
The current caretaker would dearly love a young devotee of Jodoshu Buddhism to take over the temple and grounds, but it isn’t a lifestyle that appeals to many young people these days.
- source : Michael McDonagh -


gaman no oni 我慢の鬼 demon who endures with self-control and perserverance


. Daibutsu 大仏 The Great Buddhas of Japan - Introduction .

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. Japan - Shrines and Temples - ABC-List .


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. EDO temples - the latest updates of this blog.

. Japan - Temples and their Amulets .


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